Kritigri’s Top 10 Games Played During 2017

Welcome to this years list of the top 5 10 games I played throughout the year! I’m adding 5 more onto the list this year because, well, I guess I played more games. Which is odd, considering I had less time to do so. As with last year, the games on this list were not necessarily released this year, they’re simply what I played. I do my list this way because I don’t often find myself playing the newest releases, so there wouldn’t be much of a list if I did! But before starting, I’d like to include a game that didn’t make it.


Honorable Mention – Chivalry: Medieval Warfare (5 hrs)

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A standoff!

If you go into Chivalry expecting a sensible experience with knightly knights fighting knavely knaves, you’re going to be in for a surprise. Chivalry adopts the more Game of Thrones style approach to fantasy, with screams and mud and gore. But all of this is combined with a Monty Python-esque silliness. The war cries and death screams are sufferingly long and drawn out; the taunts wouldn’t sound out of place in Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

I picked this game up via Yogscast’s Jingle Jam 2017 bundle, and while I’ve known of the game for some time, it’s never been a particularly important acquisition for me. When I booted it up for the first time only last night, however, I found myself laughing and shouting at my screen for a good few hours before pulling myself away. The combat is chaotic and mangled, but it feels fair. The flash decision to wait and parry or go in for a slash makes duels intense, with moves such as feinting, blocking and dodging making close-quarters combat and tight and exciting experience.

The different choices of class and weapon loadouts ensure that you have a variety of opponents to face, and I myself favour the archer. There’s nothing quite as satisfying as hitting a lethal shot on an enemy swinging his sword directly towards a retreating teammate. Drawing your bow takes a decent amount of time and you can’t keep your arrow notched for too long, so making sure you hit your target feels all the more important. That being said, if you’re being charged you can always fall back on your trusty secondary weapon – saber for me – and try to outplay your likely stronger opponent.

The reason I added this as an honorable mention is because I can see myself playing a damn lot of this game, but with 5 hours of playtime I simply can’t weigh this up against the other games on this list. It’s an absolute blast, and I can’t wait to continue playing it, but I couldn’t quite bear to go without mentioning it simply due to the timing of my picking it up.


#10 – Dragon Age: Inquisition (23hrs)

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Found a book nearby called “Plants versus Corpses”. Nice.

And thus begins the theme of this year’s list: Games which should have been higher up in the list, but weren’t due to me bouncing off of the game and playing something else. For Dragon Age: Inquistion, this was because I hit a certain point where I’d amassed a large amount of side quests, and after leaving my save file for a week and returning I felt overwhelmed and lost, like I had to re-learn the game and the plot. (This, to be fair, is a common RPG problem.)

I did play a sizeable portion of the main questline, though, unlocking Skyhold and filling out the roster of characters you can add to your party. I played this game way back at the start of the year, so you’ll have to excuse me for not going into detail, but I remember very much enjoying the story, the plot and mostly the environments. Despite eventually abandoning the game due to growing sidequests and subplots, I did appreciate the sheer quantity of quality content to be found in the lands of Ferelden and Orlais. During my time of play, I was fully immersed in the narrative and continued through my journeys not just because the game was fun, but because I wanted to progress the story and see how things played out. There were plenty of ‘oh shit’ moments and I don’t doubt that sometime next year I’ll reinstall and reacquaint myself with this expansive RPG.


#9 – Tower Unite (22hrs)

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My workspace. For important work.

For many years, I’ve been on the lookout for games which let you simply play minigames and make a sweet little virtual life for yourself. Of course, there have been many, with varying levels of success, but none of them really grabbed me like the idea of Playstation Home. Playstation Home, as it turned out, was complete garbage, but a GMod gamemode by the name of GMod Tower popped up with many similar features and eventually, the developers decided to build this world from the ground up as their own standalone game. This was the birth of Tower Unite, and I’ve written more extensively about it here.


#8 – Minecraft: Switch Edition (15+ hrs)

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I claimed this village! So I de-weeded and re-pathed it.

Yes yes, I can see you rolling your eyes. Let me explain.

I wouldn’t usually consider a console’s own edition of a game to be viewed as a separate game in its own right. I don’t consider Minecraft: Switch Edition to be separate to other editions. The reason I’ve put this here is because I consider this edition of Minecraft to be the perfect example of everything the Switch does right as a console.

Minecraft was my third purchase on Switch – my previous two being #6 and #5 on this list. I picked it up because I wanted something sandbox-y to mess around in while I waited for other releases, and I honestly didn’t expect much out of it. What I found instead was that all my worlds felt like little pocket dens, but without the restrictive touch controls and processing power of the actual Pocket Edition. The world I ended up settling on and playing the most was a survival-friendly flatmap with ores and caves. I set myself up in a village and have resolved myself to rebuild and expand it, alongside linking it to neighbouring villages via a nifty (but expensive) train system. This little project hooked me on survival Minecraft in a way that hasn’t happened in years, and the Switch’s portability and accessibility was key to bringing new life to a game I’ve already played to death.

Knowing that my own personal world is just a few seconds away at any given moment – and in any given place – is oddly comforting, and while my initial tunnel-vision focus on the game has passed, I often find myself picking it up to complete little projects to make life better for me and my villagers.

Animal Crossing can’t come soon enough for the Switch.


#7 – Destiny 2 (40+ hrs at a guess)

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It’s not pink, it’s lightish red!

Oh boy, do I have a lot to say about Destiny 2.

So, as someone who got to level 7 in Destiny 1 on PS3, you can safely assume that my experience with this franchise is minimal. And when the sequel was announced to be coming to PC, I was excited. After monitoring the console release, the PC beta and the general direction of the game, I made a tentative preorder a few days before launch…

And I don’t regret it. Playing through the campaign was an absolute blast and I enjoyed it all – the gunplay, the cinematics, the story, and especially the level design. Not only did three of the four locations look gorgeous (sorry Titan), but the combat and the enemies were reminiscent of a series I’d always wanted to play but never got the chance to: Halo. And the endgame, while admittedly low on incentive to complete replayable content, was full enough for me to come back to for a good few weeks. I do not regret purchasing Destiny 2.

I regret purchasing the DLC.

Curse of Osiris had a campaign that lasted merely a few hours. The story had you returning to the recently damaged Mercury – no, not the damaged side of Mercury, don’t be silly and don’t bring it up – to fight the Vex and try to save longtime mysterious character Osiris and, ostensibly, save the universe. The evil robots are doing evil robot things, such as running multitudes of probabilities in a dimension called the Infinite Forest to predict all possible outcomes in a war against, well, everyone, I guess. Naturally, they can predict all of our movements and it looks like they’re going to win, except they didn’t predict us because we’re the Guardian and we’re special. Yep. Moving on.

Gameplay wise, Curse of Osiris is even more sparse than it appears. You’ll expect me to complain about the amount of repurposed content in the DLC; for instance, every other mission in the campaign sees you returning to one of Destiny 2’s vanilla worlds to rerun an old section of content. (The enemies are different. That’s about it.) But I’m also going to bring up the fact that the game puts you through the Infinite Forest multiple times, a randomised, procedurally generated set of combat sections which removes one of the key things Bungie does well in Destiny – top-tier, hand-crafted level design.

I won’t whinge for as long as I could though, as this isn’t a full review. Suffice to say that I greatly enjoyed Destiny 2, and the DLC probably disappointed me as much as it did because I was looking for reasons to continue playing the game, and was instead convinced to just uninstall it and wait until they’ve fixed things up later down the line. This game was originally in the #2 spot, but given the questionable design decisions that have marred this game’s progress since release, I’m comfortable placing it down in #7.


#6 – Mario Kart 8 Deluxe (5+ hrs)

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What eldritch yellow demon has invaded my Mario Kart

My first Mario Kart game was DS, and up until Mario Kart 8 Deluxe it was my favourite. Sure, Mario Kart Wii and 7 may have had better handling, more characters, better tracks etc, but DS was the one I was most familiar with. In Mario Kart, you’ll be at your best when you know all the tracks and their turns, shortcuts and efficient power-sliding routes.

That being said, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe looks so good, has so much more content, and has such a good quality of said content that it even overtakes the familiarity of Mario Kart DS to claim the top spot in the franchise, for me. I’ve not really played enough of it yet to get fully stuck in, but I’ve played enough to know most of the tracks and to hold my own online – though I’ve always had a strange affinity with Mario Kart’s controls to rank decently against most people. My only real gripe with the game is that they didn’t choose some of my personal favourite tracks for the retro courses, but you can’t please everyone!

There’s not much more that can be said about Mario Kart 8 Deluxe. Yeah, it’s Mario Kart. It’s been too long since I played a new one. If you don’t play as Yoshi at any given opportunity, you’re dead to me.


#5 – Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (10+ hrs)

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Someone’s getting ready for Animal Crossing

Okay, so remember when I said that I hadn’t played enough of some of the games on this list to place them higher up? Breath of the Wild is the absolute epitome of this problem. It’s most people’s Game of the Year, and I don’t doubt it could be mine if I’d played more of it. Unfortunately, my attention span sucks, and as an example, I’d owned Skyrim for years and started many playthroughs before I finally forced myself to tunnel-vision it until I’d really latched on. From that point, I enjoyed it so much it took the top spot on last year’s list.

For the 10 hours I did play, though, I enjoyed it immensely. The influence of games like Skyrim on Breath of the Wild seem influential, which gives a fuzzy feeling inside given that games like Skyrim and the entire RPG genre originally took notes from prior Zelda games. That being said, it wouldn’t be Nintendo unless they took the idea in new directions, including weapon degradation, puzzle shrines and more, all wrapped up in a traditional Legend of Zelda type story we all know and love. (At least it seems that way from 10 hours in.)

So yes, I’m doing this game a disservice by placing it at #5 – but I’m also being honest with myself. This is a list of games I’ve personally played, not a list of games based on their objective merits as a whole. I’m sure I’ll get back to Breath of the Wild and fully focus on it in time. For now, here’s four more games that held my attention more than this one.


#4 – Quake Champions (29 hrs)

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Ah, ragdolls.

I grew up on Unreal Tournament, but unfortunately the new game isn’t doing so well. Development seems to have all but halted while the devs are focusing on other games, and the lack of any kind of progression system (last I checked) and the limitations of the game being unfinished (lack of maps etc) have caused me to turn to alternatives.

So hey, Quake Champions is a thing.

And like certain other items on my list (see #3), it’s a little controversial. Some people, like me, are fine with the implementation of the champions and enjoy the game’s evolution as a service, with new maps and champions being added over time. Others do not. Others detest the notion of game-changing abilities and unlockable cosmetics. And that’s fine, because Quake Live is still a thing. So they can go back in that direction while we all have fun with what we’re enjoying.

I play a lot of Scalebearer and DOOM Slayer (forever plastered into my brain as Doomguy). Personally I find the gunplay very satisfying and while the net code was an issue up until recently, a recent patch has greatly improved issues on that front. The abilities feel balanced, for the most part, and knowing how to deal with them adds an interesting dynamic to the traditional arena shooter gameplay.

I just wish the majority of people didn’t vote for Blood Covenant every single goddamn time it came up. I get it, it’s a classic map, the Deck 16 or Facing Worlds of Quake. But sometimes I wanna play Burial Chamber or Ruins of Sarnath. C’mon, folks. I’m good at those maps.


#3 – No Man’s Sky 1.3 (42 hrs)

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I name my spaceship The Arrowhead. It looks cool until you look into the cockpit and see all the discarded sweet wrappers.

No, I’m not mad, and no, I’m not trying to be controversial. The reason I put the game version in the title of this is because No Man’s Sky quite famously launched as a ridiculously overpromised and underdelivering game, and there’s no denying that this was a shitty move on the developer’s part. However, as someone who both loved the space stage of Spore and has a soft spot for bad games being patched until they’re good, I decided to give the game a try after hearing some good things from a friend.

No Man’s Sky is one of those few games that I found myself having to tear myself away from to go to bed, only to immediately play it the following day the moment I had some free time. The game is still plagued with a myriad of flaws and imperfections, but since 1.3 the content that’s available is well worth a look. The game has a main questline now with a decently written plot that gives depth to its strange universe; there are sidequests and motivations to push you forwards, and while the limited world generation does eventually become rote and stale, it still provides decent exploration incentive for a decent amount of time.

I’ve written more about the game here, but for now I’ll say this – the game’s desolate themes, found within its soundtrack, scope and story, is something which makes the wide emptiness of space something to be immersed in, and not driven away from. I had a good 42 hour stint back when I bought the game, and I now find myself looking to reinstall it and fire up my trusty Arrowhead to delve into the abyss once more.


#2 – Super Mario Odyssey (15+ hrs)

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All in a day’s work.

I was as sceptical as anyone else when this patchwork quilt of a game was unveiled earlier this year. New York in the same world as the Mushroom Kingdom? Talking hats? Possession of sentient creatures? I basically wrote it off for a good few months. But then I reflected on some of the previous 3D Mario games I’d missed, and began to reconsider. And boy, am I glad I did.

Super Mario Odyssey is perhaps the most fun I’ve had in a 3D platformer since the Ratchet and Clank series. I’ve been yearning for a good 3D platforming collectathon for a while now, and have found that the older games aren’t as fun as I remember and the newer ones don’t live up to the past. I was actually thinking that this genre was maybe not for me after all, until I played this game.

Odyssey is as thematically spontaneous as the trailers suggested, and this has led not to a loss of unity of effect, but instead a brilliantly successful tour of the many wonders of, well, whatever Mario’s planet is called. Each level has a set of diverse and unique enemies, some returning from older games and some new. There’s usually one standout enemy that has a unique ability you can use once you possess them, from swimming in lava to lengthening your body across long gaps, and what’s amazing is that the game touches on each new mechanic for only a brief period of time before launching you into something completely different. It’s an Odyssey in every sense of the word.

What’s also impressive is the amount of content available to you after completing the main game. I won’t spoil anything, but there’s an absolute plethora of activities to keep you occupied after you confront Bowser and reach the end credits. I imagine that there’s probably more to do post-game than during the story!


#1 – Overwatch  (128 hrs)

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Do you need a hug?

When Blizzard announced that they were developing a competitive, hero-based first-person shooter, I was very excited. My laptop couldn’t really run the game though, so I put it out of my mind until April of this year when I took the plunge and bought it. And I don’t think I’ve stopped plunging since. The longest period of time I’ve been absent from the game was for about two or three weeks, and that felt weird. I’m always playing a game or two, usually with my friend Reece. It’s so easy to pick up and play. So, where to begin?

I’m a level 177 all-rounder (thanks Mystery Heroes), though my most-played hero is Roadhog. Seeing the game from outside I always thought I’d main Reaper thanks to his dual-shotguns and his abilities simply appealing to me. After seeing my friend play Roadhog, however, I gave him a try, and pretty much mained him until his damage was nerfed and he could no longer one-shot most heroes after a hook. That being said, he’s still one of my more consistently played heroes to this day, followed by Ana (who I suppose I mained a bit after the nerf), Hanzo (who I admittedly suck as), Pharah (who’s fun depending on who you’re up against), Junkrat (who I seem to consistently get many kills with) and McCree (who scratches the same itch Unreal Tournament’s instagib mutator did, providing I get the headshots).

Overwatch doesn’t have a campaign, but it does a phenomenal job of characterising the heroes through a combination of voice lines and interactions in the spawn room, emotes, skins, and outside media. It has the most diverse roster of original characters I’ve ever seen, and the world they inhabit is as fascinating as it is familiar. The maps are thematically diverse in the best sense; one match you could be pushing a payload down a narrow London street, while the next, you could be trying to attack the point in a space base on the moon. The cartoonish style of the heroes and environments separates Overwatch from many other competitive shooters on the market, giving it a distinct style that makes it immediately recognisable, while not looking childish or naff.

As a longtime WoW and Diablo 3 player I’m already a big fan of what Blizzard create, and Overwatch is no exception. I don’t think I’ll ever quite get into Hearthstone or Heroes of the Storm (much as I like their aesthetic and cosmetics, respectively), but in Overwatch, Blizzard have cemented their place as my favourite and perhaps most trusted games developer so far. Their design philosophies, from “don’t ship it til it’s ready”, to their general release model for updates and patches has earned my consistent attention, and while they often make some questionable decisions (like dismissing the notion that their loot boxes should be included in the ongoing controversy), I always have faith that they’ll find the right path.

I hope.

Diablo 4 please.
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